Bed Bugs are rapidly resurging and capturing the attention of many countries throughout the world. It is essential that accurate knowledge of bed bugs, their habits, biology, reproduction, effective treatments and prevention strategies will assist in reducing the incidence of bed bug infestations worldwide.

There are several factors that accompany the resurgence of bed bugs in our modern day society that have included:

  • International travel
  • Developing resistance to some commonly used pesticides
  • People not recognizing signs of bed bug infestations or bites – [bed bugs are so great at hiding
  • that people tend not to look for them and a percentage of people are not affected by the bite of a bed bug]

  • A previous generation of professionals that had never encountered or seen a bed bug.
  • Lack of society education
  • EDUCATE – BED BUG IDENTIFICATION AND NATURE – SINCE PEOPLE TEND TO MISTAKE OTHER BUGS FOR BED BUGS, PROPER IDENTIFICATION IS IMPORTANT.
    Bed bugs, scientifically known as Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera: Cimicidae) are small insects that are flattened dorsally. Bed bugs have evolved as “nest” parasites from inhabiting the roosts of bats and nests of bird’s centuries ago. Since bed bugs feed upon warm blood, we as humans are perfect hosts. It is very important to know what a bed bug looks like compared to similar insects as the treatment options and costs are very different. Adult bed bugs are reddish brown in color, have 6 legs and are approximately ¼ inch in length. The adults can easily be seen with the naked eye.

    EGGS: A female bed bug can lay a few hundred eggs in her lifetime of many months to around a year, but these are not deposited at one time and regular feeding and mating are required. These eggs are attached to surfaces by a sticky substance and can be difficult to see. Depending on temperature and conditions, these eggs can hatch anywhere from three [3] to ten [10] days or longer. When first hatched, the immature bed bug (nymph) is translucent, pearl whitish in color and become slightly darker as they reach maturity. Although the young nymph isn’t always easy to see, after a nymph feeds it will become plump and red because the blood inside shows through their pale skin.